Disability Awareness

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What Is Disability Awareness

Disability Awareness means educating people regarding disabilities and giving people the knowledge required to carry out a job or task thus separating good practice from poor. It is no longer enough just to know that disability discrimination is unlawful.

The biggest barriers people with disabilities encounter are other people. Disability Awareness means educating people regarding disabilities and giving people the knowledge required to carry out a job or task thus separating good practice from poor. It is no longer enough just to know that disability discrimination is unlawful.

For instance disability awareness relates to topics such as a recent paper released by the Council for Disability Awareness that examines the lack of awareness of the risks and the financial burden that an unexpected accident or illness can have on retirement savings.

Despite the fact that three in 10 workers entering the workforce today will become disabled before retiring, disability is often overlooked as a threat to long-term financial security.

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Hidden Disability Awareness

People with hidden disabilities often do not feel like they belong within the disability community because they are not considered to be "disabled enough" to fit into the group.

People with hidden disabilities are caught between not being fully accepted as people without disabilities, and not being recognized as having "real" disabilities.

Disability Awareness Week:

Disability Awareness Week (DAW) continues the tradition of National Access Awareness Week first established in 1988 to promote better community access for people with disabilities.

Disability Awareness Week covers all types of disabilities and all age groups in partnerships with any interested supporters. See our List of Awareness Days, Weeks and Months for other observance dates.

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Disability Etiquette

Disability etiquette are guidelines dealing specifically with how to approach people with disabilities and were initially created to challenge social conventions rather than to reinforce them.

Most disability etiquette guidelines seem to be predicated on a simple dictate: "Do not assume..." They are written to address real and perceived shortcomings in how society as a whole treats people with disabilities.

"Disability etiquette" exists to draw attention to common assumptions and misconceptions through the provision of guidelines that contradict them. More than that, however, these guidelines are evolving to approximate social etiquette among the non-disabled, in hope that people with disabilities will be treated with "common courtesy." (McGrattan, 2001)